Archive for the 'Comprehensive Pain' Category

Americans can’t pay for newspapers and gas median wages at 1973 levels

May 25, 2008

Men’s median wages are the same as in 1973. Gas is at 4 dollars per gallon. So Americans can’t pay for the newspapers that want more immigrants to come to keep wages low. See graph p60-233.pdf for men and women’s median wages.

Bush McCain Comprehensive Pain Tour (Spoof)

Bush: I always hated newspapers.

McCain: Me too.

Bush: They fell for our plan, to go out of business by putting their readers out of existence.

McCain: Press are like frogs in hot water.

Bush: You ever do that as a kid, put a frog in hot water and watch it die.

McCain: Yeah.

Bush: Me too.

McCain: Amnesty is the hot water.

Bush: Legal immigration is the stove.

Both laugh uncontrollably.

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http://weblogs.chicagotribune.com/news/politics/blog/2008/05/myths_about_the_white_male_vot.html

Posted May 25, 2008 6:30 AM

The Swamp

by Michael Tackett

This message is for that oppressed, neglected, passed over, bitter, gun-toting group of people otherwise known as working-class white males: You really don’t matter.

To all the hand-wringing over Sen. Barack Obama’s alleged problem with winning over the votes of those white men, let’s counter with some other facts.

Obama has a lot of company. John Kerry. Al Gore. Bill Clinton. Michael Dukakis. Walter Mondale. Jimmy Carter. Just to name the six most recent Democratic nominees who lost the white, working-class, male vote.

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Washington Post lays off more staff.

https://oldatlanticlighthouse.wordpress.com/2008/05/23/washington-post-layoffs-another-immigration-booster/

Frank Ahrens at WaPo: This is the third round of buyouts The Post has offered in the past five years. The first came in 2003, the second in 2006. Post newsroom employment peaked at 908 in 2003; there are now about 780 full-time-equivalent newsroom workers. After the buyouts, that number will be about 700.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/22/AR2008052203753.html

In 1999, for instance, the newspaper division of The Post Co. reported $157 million in operating income. By 2007, that number had fallen to $66 million. Daily average circulation of The Post peaked at 832,232 in 1993. It stands at 638,300.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newspaper_circulation

The World Association of Newspapers (WAN) publishes a list of newspapers with the largest circulation. In 2005, China topped the list in term of total newspaper circulation with 93.5 million a day, India came second with 78.8 million, followed by Japan, with 70.4 million; the United States, with 48.3 million; and Germany, with 22.1 million. Around 75 of the 100 best selling newspapers are in Asia and seven out of top ten are Japanese newspapers. [1]

See graph p60-233.pdf for men and women’s median wages in the US. Men’s median wages are the same as in 1973, women’s are what men made in 1960. Could money be the reason that US circulation is falling? The US newspapers make themselves not matter by making white men not matter.

The heyday of the newspaper industry was the 1940s, but the percentage of Americans reading newspapers began to decline with the increased competition from radio and television. A growing population helped the absolute circulation numbers continue to increase until the 1970s, where it remained stable until the 1990s, when absolute circulation numbers began declining.

Funny the Japanese don’t have radio or TV. They make them and export them? Same with Chinese and India. US population increased in the 1990’s from immigration. But circulation fell. Why? Spanish speakers and their kids don’t read Anglo papers? Men’s median wages the same as in 1973. Women’s median wages stopped going up around 1990 when immigration increased.

In Germany, CEO’s still make 11 or so times workers (I heard this on TV from Jim Webb on Lou Dobbs, see Webb’s new book to check for a source.) Germany the papers are doing well? Because people have rising wages? Its interesting that US journalists think median wages the same as 1973 is not the reason that circulation stopped increasing in the 1970’s and then fell in the 1990’s.

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Japan

The 2004 circulation figures for the morning and evening editions of Japan’s largest newspapers: Yomiuri Shimbun, 14,067,000; The Asahi Shimbun, 12,121,000; Mainichi Shimbun, 5,587,000; Seikyou Shimbun, 5,500,000; Nihon Keizai Shimbun, 4,635,000; Chunichi Shimbun/Tokyo Shimbun,4,512,000; Tokyo Sports, 2,425,000; Sankei Shimbun, 2,757,000; Nikkan Sports, 1,965,000; Hokkaido Shimbun, 1,896,594; Sports Nippon, 1,711,000; The Nikkan Gendai, 1,686,000; Akahata, 1,683,000; Yukan Fuji, 1,559,000; Shizuoka Shimbun, 1,479,000; Sankei Sports, 1,368,000; Hochi Shimbun, 1,354,000; Daily Sports, 999,000; [3]

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United States

The heyday of the newspaper industry was the 1940s, but the percentage of Americans reading newspapers began to decline with the increased competition from radio and television. A growing population helped the absolute circulation numbers continue to increase until the 1970s, where it remained stable until the 1990s, when absolute circulation numbers began declining.

Newspaper circulation numbers are reported to the Audit Bureau of Circulations. Best-selling papers as of March 31, 2007 in the U.S.A., according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, are USA Today, 2,524,965; The Wall Street Journal, 2,068,439 and The New York Times, 1,627,062.

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So in the US, circulation is nowhere near that of Japan.  But Japan has one-third the people.  But in Japan the schools don’t focus on immigrants.  In Japan, median wages rise with productivity.  In the US, men’s median wages are the same as in 1973 even though productivity doubled.  The US newspaper that does well is the Wall Street Journal.  The others go in the tank.  The WSJ supports immigration.  Why do the others?

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_newspapers_in_the_World_by_circulation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_newspapers_in_the_United_States_by_circulation


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