Archive for the 'Hanna-Barbera' Category

Cucamonga, California “eliminated by European invasion”

July 28, 2007

“The Native American cultures of southern California had stabilized some three thousand years ago, thriving until almost eliminated by European invasion.” From history of Cucamonga, California.

To find the history section. Go to the link, City of Rancho Cucamonga, California, choose Facts and Figures in menu, and choose History of RC.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rancho_Cucamonga,_California

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 127,743 people, 40,863 households, and 31,832 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,317.0/km² (3,411.4/mi²). There were 42,134 housing units at an average density of 434.4/km² (1,125.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 66.53% White, 7.87% African American, 0.67% Native American, 5.99% Asian, 0.27% Pacific Islander, 13.25% from other races, and 5.41% from a biracial or multiracial background. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 27.78% of the population.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillbilly_Hare

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugs_Bunny

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mel_Blanc

Mel Blanc was on the Jack Benny Program. Mel Blanc was the voice of “Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird and Barney Rubble” for Warner Brothers and Hanna-Barbera during ” the Golden Age of American animation.”

Another famous Blanc schtick on Jack’s show was the train Depot announcer who inevitably intoned, sidelong: “Train leaving on Track Five for Anaheim, Azusa, and Cucamonga“. Part of that joke was the Angelino studio audience’s awareness that no such train existed connecting those then-small towns (years before Disneyland opened). To the wider audience, the primary joke was the pregnant pause that evolved over time between “Cuc..” and “…amonga” — eventually minutes would pass while the skit went on, the audience awaiting the inevitable conclusion of the word. On at least one occasion, a completely different skit followed before the inevitable “…amonga” finally appeared. For his contribution to radio, Mel Blanc has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6385 Hollywood Blvd.

Melvin Jerome Blanc (May 30, 1908July 10, 1989)

“Born in San Francisco, California to Jewish parents, he grew up in Portland, Oregon, attending Lincoln High School. “

“Blanc’s success on the Jack Benny Program led to his own radio show on the CBS radio network, The Mel Blanc Show, which ran from September 3, 1946 to June 24, 1947. Blanc played himself as the hapless owner of a fix-it shop, in addition to a wide range of comical support characters. Other regular characters were played by Mary Jane Croft, Joseph Kearns, Hans Conried, Alan Reed, Earle Ross, Jim Backus and Bea Benaderet.”

“Blanc also appeared on other national radio programs such as The Abbott and Costello Show, Burns and Allen as the Happy Postman, August Moon on Point Sublime, Sad Sack on G.I. Journal, and later played various small parts on Benny’s television show.”

search Cucamonga Mel Blanc

search “All the way to Cucamonga”  or “way to Cucamonga”

Many of the wiki quotes above appear to come from:

http://www.hollywoodusa.co.uk/ForeverObituaries/melblanc.htm

Blanc died in Los Angeles, California, and is interred in the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood, California. Blanc’s will stated his desire to have the inscription on his gravestone read, “THAT’S ALL FOLKS”, considered by some to be one of the most famous epitaphs in the world.

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